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Learning Christian and Classical Latin Together:

College Course Self-Study Program

“Latin is dead, dead, dead as dead can be.  First it killed the Romans, now it’s killing me.”

-A person who was alive when he invented this saying

While the little rhyme above is popular among those who are unwillingly forced to learn Latin, aspiring  and eager Latin students may perhaps instead prefer Veni, vidi, vici–Caesar’s famous saying, “I came, I saw, I conquered.”  But Christians submit to Christ before Casear—so they are more likely to value Ego sum via et veritas et vita (John 14:6) far more highly than veni, vidi, vici—Christ’s “I am the way, the truth, and the life” above Caesar’s bloody conquests?  What if, while viewing as valuable arma virumque cano—Virgil’s “Arms and the man I sing,” the conquests of the “pious” Greek and Roman war hero—and idolatrous fornicator—Aeneas, they would rather learn Christ’s in me pacem habeatis (John 16:33), “in Me ye may have peace”?  Or what if they recognize the value of classical Latin to Western civilization, but they wish to learn both Christian and classical Latin at the same time, instead of only focusing on classical pagan authors to the exclusion of the writers of Christendom?

What if they want to learn the language that has had such an incredible impact on Christianity for over 1,500 years—the language of the Old Latin and Vulgate Bibles;

Old Latin Latin Vulgate Bible manuscript

the language known by Biblical writers such as John Mark, by early Christians, by patristic writers, by the writer and audience of the Athanasian Creed, by influential medieval theologians, by reformers and Puritans, and by many influential Baptist leaders?  What if they want to understand the untranslated portions of Keil & Delitzch’s Commentary on the Old Testament and many other technical and historically important commentaries?

What if, rather than only focusing upon the approximately 0.01% of all extant Latin that is the classical Roman authors, they are interested in the approximately 80% of extant Latin writings composed by those who professed to be Christians (Derek Cooper, Basics of Latin: A Grammar with Readings and Exercises from the Christian Tradition [Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Academic, 2020], xvii)?

Can such people learn both Christian and classical Latin together, at their own pace?  Yes they can—using the curriculum outlined below.

Latin is learned inductively using the Familia Romana series.  Written entirely in Latin, the student text presents an engaging story of a Roman family with all their adventures.  It has pictures, side-notes, and other helps so that the student can understand the Latin in Latin.  How does this work?  Consider how the first chapter begins.  After the following two pretty pictures the first block of text reads:

Imperium Romanum Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata Hans Orberg Pars 1 Familia Romana Roman Empire Picture in Latin

Insula oppidum fluvius Imperium Romanum capitulum primum Hans Orberg Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata Pars 1 Familia Romana

Rōma in Italiā* est. Italia in Eurōpā est. Graecia in Eurōpā est. Italia et Graecia in Eurōpā sunt. Hispānia quoque in Eurōpā est.* Hispānia et Italia et Graecia in Eurōpā sunt.

[5] Aegyptus in Eurōpā nōn est, Aegyptus in Āfricā est. Gallia nōn in Āfricā est, Gallia est in Eurōpā. Syria nōn est in Eurōpā, sed in Asiā. Arabia quoque in Asiā est. Syria et Arabia in Asiā sunt. Germānia nōn in Asiā, sed in Eurōpā est. Britannia quoque in Eurōpā est. Germā nia [10] et Britannia sunt in Eurōpā.

Estne Gallia in Eurōpā? Gallia in Eurōpā est.* Estne* Rōma in Galliā? Rōma in Galliā nōn est. Ubi est Rōma? Rōma est in Italiā. Ubi est Italia? Italia in Eurōpā est. Ubi sunt Gallia et Hispānia? Gallia et Hispānia in Eurōpā [15] sunt.

Estne Nīlus in Eurōpā? Nīlus in Eurōpā nōn est. Ubi est Nīlus? Nīlus in Āfricā est. Rhēnus ubi est? Rhēnus est in Germāniā. Nīlus fluvius est. Rhēnus fluvius est. Nīlus et Rhēnus fluviī sunt.* Dānuvius quoque fluvius [20] est. Rhēnus et Dānuvius sunt fluviī in Germāniā. Tiberis fluvius in Italiā est.

-a -ā:

Italia

in Italiā

est sunt:

Italia in Eurōpā est;

Italia et Graecia in Eurōpā sunt

* est-ne…?

* –ne = …?

-us -ī:

Nīlus fluvius est;

Nīlus et Rhēnus fluviī sunt

Can you understand what the Latin means? Why yes you can—you are learning Latin in the same sort of way that you learned English as a child (or whatever other language was your first language). By comparing the text with the pictures and the marginal notes (reproduced below the text in the quotation in this blog post), you are able to understand what is taking place.  The successive chapters build gradually on each other and you learn Latin naturally.

For students learning Latin without a teacher, the teacher’s books and guides enable students to be sure that they are getting everything straight.  (While the student textbook is entirely in Latin, the grammatical and other material in the other works are in English and present the material in a way that a dedicated student can successfully learn the language on his own.)

After grammatical concepts are learned and reviewed through the Familia Romana series inductively, they are then reinforced through both the teacher’s materials and the student’s materials in that series.  They are then employed in a specifically Christian or Ecclesiastical Latin setting, through the grammars by John Collins and Derek Cooper.  (Interestingly, while classical Latin is the focus of the Familia Romana series, Christians do enter the story—how?  You’ll have to read it to find out!)   By combining all three of these works—inductive learning of classical Latin with many exercises and plenty of review in the Familia Romana series and the Latin of Christendom in the works by Collins and Cooper, the student may, through the completion of the regimen below, gain a solid grasp of both Christian and classical Latin and open a door into this incredibly influential language for both the Christian tradition and Western civilization in general.

Textbooks:

1.) Ørberg, Hans H., Familia Romana, Lingua Latina: Per Se Illustrata. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 2003.       Amazon Smile link

2.) Ørberg, Hans H., Latine Disco: Student’s Manual, Lingua Latina: Per Se Illustrata.  Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 2005.      Amazon Smile link

3.) Ørberg, Hans H., Colloquia Personarum, Lingua Latina: Per Se Illustrata. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 2005.       Amazon Smile link

4.) Ørberg, Hans H., Familia Romana: Exercitia Latina I, Lingua Latina: Per Se Illustrata Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 2005.       Amazon Smile link

5.) Ørberg, Hans H., Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Teacher’s Materials. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 2005.       Amazon Smile link

6.) Neumann, Jeanne Marie, Lingua Latina: A College Companion Based on Hans Ørberg’s Latine Disco, with Vocabulary and Grammar, Lingua Latina: Per Se Illustrata. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 2016.      Amazon smile link

7.) Brown, C. G. & Luigi Miraglia, Latine Doceo: A Companion for Instructors, Lingua Latina: Per Se Illustrata. Newburyport, MA: Focus Publishing, 2004.       Amazon smile link

8.) Cooper, Derek, Basics of Latin: A Grammar with Readings and Exercises from the Christian Tradition. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Academic, 2020.      Amazon smile link

9.) Cooper, Derek, Basics of Latin Video Lectures: For Use with Basics of Latin: A Grammar with Readings and Exercises from the Christian Tradition. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Academic, 2020       Amazon smile link

10.) Collins, John. A Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin. Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press, 1985.       Amazon smile link

11.) Dunlap, John R., An Answer Key to A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin: A Supplement to the Text by John F. Collins. Washington, D. C.: Catholic University of America, 2006.       Amazon smile link

12.) Ørberg, Hans H., Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II: Roma Aeterna, 2nd ed. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 1990.       Amazon smile link

13.) Ørberg, Hans H, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II: Roma Aeterna: Exercitia Latina II. Newburyport, MA: Focus Publishing, 2007.       Amazon smile link

14.) Neumann, Jeanne Marie, A Companion to Roma Aeterna: Based on Hans Ørberg’s Instructions, with Vocabulary and Grammar. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 2017.        Amazon smile link

15.) Carfagni, Roberto, Epitome Historiae Sacrae. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 2009.       Amazon smile link

16.) Simpson, D. P., Cassell’s Latin Dictionary: Latin-English & English-Latin, 5th ed. New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing, 1968.       Amazon smile link

Recommended:

17.) Ørberg, Hans H., Grammatica Latina, Lingua Latina: Per Se Illustrata. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing, 2006.       Amazon smile link

18.) Carfagni, Roberto, Nova Exercitia Latina I. Montella, Italy: Schola Latina, 2016.       Amazon smile link

19.) Carfagni, Roberto, Nova Exercitia Latina I Soluta. Montella, Italy: Schola Latina, 2016.       Amazon smile link

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Order of Learning for Familia Romana:

Note that with each chapter below, when a chapter in Familia Romana (FR) is assigned below, the associated exercises, helps, and other tools will be read along with it.  Along with each chapter of Familia Romana, the equivalent chapter in Latine Disco: Student’s Manual (LD), Colloquia Personarum (CP—only goes through the first 24 chapters) and Neumann’s Lingua Latina: A College Companion (LLCC) must also be read, and all the exercises in Exercitia Latina I (EL I) and Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Teacher’s Materials (LLTM) must be completed and checked with the answer key in LLTM.  If the student feels he needs additional exercises to really grasp the material, he can also complete the exercises in Nova Exercitia Latina I and check his answers using Nova Exercitia Latina I Soluta.

The works above will be studied in the following order.  Only when all of the below is completed will the chapter in Familia Romana be considered to have been learned.

I.) Overview reading: the chapter in Familia Romana will be read carefully, paying special attention to the pictures and marginal notes.  No words will be looked up, and whatever is not understood will be passed by at this time.

II.) The chapter in Lingua Latina: A College Companion will be read carefully.  After reading the chapter carefully, the new paradigms, syntactical features, and vocabulary for the chapter will begin to be memorized.

Optional step:  If it helps with the process of self-learning, the vocabulary for the chapter, along with the new syntactical material and paradigms, can be recorded using an electronic device.  The audio can then be reviewed while commuting, doing chores, etc.

III.) The chapter in Familia Romana will be carefully read a second time.  This time through the student must make sure that he understands every sentence in the chapter and all of its grammatical features.  He must look up words that he does not understand and make sure that he understands the syntactical features in the chapter.

IV.) The chapter in Latine Disco: Student’s Manual will be read and its new material learned.

V.) The chapter in Lingua Latina: A College Companion will be read a second time, and new paradigms, syntactical features, and vocabulary will be refreshed and strengthened in his mind.

VI.) The chapter in Colloquia Personarum will be read through twice.  It will be read once as an overview and a second time making sure that every sentence, vocabulary word, and syntactical feature of the chapter is understood, in a manner comparable to steps I and III above.

VII.) The material pertaining to the chapter in Latine Doceo: A Companion for Instructors will be read and learned.

VIII.) The chapter in Familia Romana will be read through a third time, confirming that a proper understanding of every sentence with its syntactical structure and vocabulary is understood.  After reading the pensa of the chapter are read, the exercises for that pensum in Exercitia Latina I will be completed, the answers checked in Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Teacher’s Materials, and all errors corrected.  After finishing the third read-through of the complete chapter, the three exercitia found in each chapter of Familia Romana will be completed using the appropriate page in Latina Per Se Illustrata: Teacher’s Materials, with its answers checked using the answer keys in that volume.

IX.) Optional step:  If the student still does not feel that he has a complete grasp on the material in the chapter, he can also complete the exercises in Nova Exercitia Latina I and check his work using Nova Exercitia Latina I Soluta.

 

X.) The chapter in Familia Romana will be read a fourth time for review and mastery.  At this point every word, sentence, and structure in the chapter should make perfect sense.  If it does not, whatever requires further review will be reviewed and strengthened.

XI.) The chapter in Lingua Latina: A College Companion will be read a third time.  Complete mastery of everything in the chapter should be present.

XII.) The chapter in Colloquia Personarum will be read a third time for review and mastery.  At this point every word, sentence, and structure in the chapter should make perfect sense.  If it does not, whatever requires further review will be reviewed and strengthened.

Only after the completion of the twelve steps above will the chapter in Familia Romana be considered mastered, and only after the completion of these twelve steps will the student proceed to the next chapter.  All of the steps above are required for every chapter, with the sole exception of optional step IX.

 

Order of Learning for Derek Cooper, Basics of Latin

 

When reading chapters in Cooper’s Basics of Latin (BL) the order below will be followed.

I.) The chapter will be carefully read to obtain an overview of the material.

II.) The video lecture for the chapter in Basics of Latin Video Lectures will be watched.

III.) The chapter will be read again, and new paradigms, syntactical features, and vocabulary will be memorized.  The definite majority of the paradigms and syntactical features should already have been introduced and learned by reading Familia Romana, but Cooper (and Collins) provide a more deductive approach and help produce synthesis for Familia Romana’s inductive presentation.  Furthermore, of course, Cooper and Collins introduce the student to what is specific to Ecclesiastical or Christian Latin.

Optional step:  If it helps with the process of self-learning, the vocabulary for the chapter, along with the new syntactical material and paradigms, can be recorded using an electronic device.  The audio can then be reviewed while commuting, doing chores, etc.

IV.) The exercises for the chapter will be completed and their answers checked.

V.) The chapter will be read a third time for review, refreshment, and confirmation of the mastery of the material.

 

Only after the completion of the five steps above will the chapter in Cooper’s Basics of Latin be considered mastered, and only after the completion of these five steps will the student proceed to the next chapter.

Order of Learning for John Collins, Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin

When reading chapters in Collins’ Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin (PE) the order below will be followed.

I.) The chapter will be carefully read to obtain an overview of the material.

II.) The chapter will be read a second time, and new paradigms, syntactical features, and vocabulary will be memorized.  The definite majority of the paradigms and syntactical features should already have been introduced and learned by reading Familia Romana, but Collins (like Cooper) provide a more deductive approach and help produce synthesis for Familia Romana’s inductive presentation.  Furthermore, of course, Cooper and Collins introduce the student to what is specific to Ecclesiastical or Christian Latin.

Optional step:  If it helps with the process of self-learning, the vocabulary for the chapter, along with the new syntactical material and paradigms, can be recorded using an electronic device.  The audio can then be reviewed while commuting, doing chores, etc.

III.) The exercises for the chapter will be completed and their answers checked.

IV.) The chapter will be read a third time for review, refreshment, and confirmation of the mastery of the material.

 

Only after the completion of the four steps above will the chapter in Cooper’s Basics of Latin be considered mastered, and only after the completion of these five steps will the student proceed to the next chapter.

Order of Learning for Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II: Roma Aeterna

Note that with each chapter below, when a chapter in Roma Aeterna (RA) is assigned below, the associated exercises, helps, and other tools will be read along with it.  Along with each chapter of Roma Aeterna, the equivalent chapter in Neumann’s A Companion to Roma Aeterna (CRA) will be read, and all the exercises in Exercitia Latina II (EL II) will be completed and the answers checked with the answer key in Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Teacher’s Materials (LLTM).

The works above will be studied in the following order.  Only when all of the below is completed will the chapter in Roma Aeterna be considered to have been learned.

I.) Overview reading: the chapter in Roma Aeterna will be read carefully, paying special attention to the pictures and marginal notes.  No words will be looked up, and whatever is not understood will be passed by at this time.

II.) The chapter in A Companion to Roma Aeterna will be read carefully.  After reading the chapter carefully, the new paradigms, syntactical features, and vocabulary for the chapter will be memorized.

Optional step:  If it helps with the process of self-learning, the vocabulary for the chapter, along with the new syntactical material and paradigms, can be recorded using an electronic device.  The audio can then be reviewed while commuting, doing chores, etc.

III.) The chapter in Roma Aeterna will be carefully read a second time.  This time through the student must make sure that he understands every sentence in the chapter and all of its grammatical features.  He must look up words that he does not understand and make sure that he understands the syntactical features in the chapter.

IV.) The chapter in A Companion to Roma Aeterna will be read a second time, and new paradigms, syntactical features, and vocabulary will be refreshed and strengthened in his mind.

V.) Every exercise in Exercitia Latina II will be completed, the answers checked in Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Teacher’s Materials, and all errors corrected.

 

VI.) The chapter in Roma Aeterna will be read a third time for review and mastery.  At this point every word, sentence, and structure in the chapter should make perfect sense.  If it does not, whatever requires further review will be reviewed and strengthened.

VII.) The chapter in A Companion to Roma Aeterna will be read a third time.  Complete mastery of everything in the chapter should be present.

Only after the completion of the seven steps above will the chapter in Roma Aeterna be considered mastered, and only after the completion of these twelve steps will the student proceed to the next chapter.  All of the steps above are required for every chapter.

Order of Learning for Epitome Historiae Sacrae

Note that with each chapter below, when a chapter in Epitome Historiae Sacrae (HS) is assigned below, the associated exercises will be read along with it.  Along with each chapter of Epitome all the exercises in the text will be completed and the answers checked with the answer key.

The work will be studied in the following order.  Only when all of the below is completed will the chapter in Epitome Historiae Sacrae be considered to have been learned.

I.) Overview reading: the assigned section in Epitome Historiae Sacrae will be read carefully, paying special attention to the pictures and marginal notes.  No words will be looked up, and whatever is not understood will be passed by at this time.

II.) The assigned section in Epitome Historiae Sacrae will be read carefully a second time.  This time through the student must make sure that he understands every sentence in the chapter and all of its grammatical features.  He must look up words that he does not understand and make sure that he understands the syntactical features in the chapter.

Optional step:  If it helps with the process of self-learning, the vocabulary for the chapter can be recorded using an electronic device.  The audio can then be reviewed while commuting, doing chores, etc.

III.) Every exercise in Epitome Historiae Sacrae will be completed, the answers checked, and all errors corrected.

 

IV.) The assigned pages in Epitome Historiae Sacrae will be read a third time for review and mastery.  At this point every word, sentence, and structure in the chapter should make perfect sense.  If it does not, whatever requires further review will be reviewed and strengthened.

Only after the completion of the four steps above will the assigned pages in Epitome Historiae Sacrae be considered mastered, and only after the completion of these four steps will the student proceed to the next section.  All of the steps above are required for every section.

Order of Reading for the Several Texts:

Note: The order below is designed for the student to gain acquaintance with the structures of the Latin language using Familia Romana’s inductive method and then get confirmation of those structures, and what is requisite for Ecclesiastical Latin in particular, from Cooper and Collins.

Familia Romana I

Familia Romana II

Familia Romana III

Familia Romana IV

Familia Romana V

Familia Romana VI

Familia Romana VII

Familia Romana VIII

Familia Romana IX

Familia Romana X

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin I

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition I

Familia Romana XI

Familia Romana XII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin II

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition II

Familia Romana XIII

Familia Romana XIV

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin III

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition III

Familia Romana XV

Familia Romana XVI

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin IV

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition IV

Familia Romana XVII

Familia Romana XVIII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin V

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition V

Familia Romana XIX

Familia Romana XX

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin VI

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition VI

Familia Romana XXI

Familia Romana XXII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin VII

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition VII

Familia Romana XXIII

Familia Romana XXIV

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin VIII

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition VIII

Familia Romana XXV

Familia Romana XXVI

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin IX

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition IX

Familia Romana XXVII

Familia Romana XXVIII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin X

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition X

Familia Romana XXIX

Familia Romana XXX

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XI

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XI

Familia Romana XXXI

Familia Romana XXXII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XII

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XII

Familia Romana XXXIII

Familia Romana XXXIV

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XIII

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XIII

Familia Romana XXXV.  You have finished Familia Romana—congratulations!

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XIV

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XIV

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XXXVI

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XV

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XV

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XXXVII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XVI

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XVI

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XXXVIII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XVII

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XVII

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XXXIX

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XVIII

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XVIII

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XL

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XIX

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XIX

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XLI

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XX

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XX

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XLII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXI

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XXI

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XLIII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXII

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XXII

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XLIV

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXIII

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XXIII

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XLV

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXIV

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XXIV

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XLVI

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXV

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XXV

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XLVII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXVI

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XXVI

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XLVIII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXVII

Basics of Latin: A Grammar from the Christian Tradition XXVII & Conclusion. You have finished Basics of Latin—congratulations!

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II XLIX

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXVIII

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II L

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXIX

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LI

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXX

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXXI

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LIII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXXII

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LIV

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXXIII

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LV

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXXIV

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LVI

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin XXXV

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LVII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin Extra readings #1-3 (pgs. 328-343)

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LVIII

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin Extra readings #4-15 (pgs. 343-363)

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LVIV

Primer on Ecclesiastical Latin Extra readings #16-23 & metrical notes & morphology summary (pgs. 363-409).  You have finished A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin—congratulations!

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LX

Epitome Historiae Sacrae Introduction & Aetas I-II (pgs. 1-24)

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LXI

Epitome Historiae Sacrae Aetas III, parts 1-4 (pgs. 25-68)

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LXII

Epitome Historiae Sacrae Aetas IV, parts 1-3 (pgs. 69-106)

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LXIII

Epitome Historiae Sacrae Aetas V, parts 1-3 (pgs. 107-138)

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LXIV

Epitome Historiae Sacrae Aetas VI (pgs. 139-154)

Roma Aeterna, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata: Pars II LXV

Epitome Historiae Sacrae Nouum Testamentum (pgs. 155-184)  You have finished Epitome Historiae Sacrae—congratulations!

RA LXVI  You have finished Roma Aeterna—congratulations!

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